Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Of little weight

I'm sure we've all hoped that someone will come along with a wand and make us thinner - hence a site such as this: http://www.weightlosswand.com. Well, folks, it ain't gonna happen. In the script I'm writing currently in collaboration with a friend, the witch attended a low decile Witch School - she doesn't even own a wand, so don't expect any help from the likes of her.

Well that bit of a ramble was by way of introduction to a post I wrote back in April where I mentioned I was involved in a play called Love - or Nearest Offer. (It's a wonder I didn't call it Love or Near Offer, which is what we all thought it was called until the posters went up - and in fact, in the prologue that was written specially for this production, the actor still called it Love or Near Offer.)

Anyway, it went well - Bert Nisbet turned in his usual wonderfully detailed performance, playing an uncouth Aussie car saleman who planned to take over the running of a dating agency called, Love of your life. Janice Snowden (I hadn't known her surname until I just looked it up!) was his opponent in this, the current part owner/manager of the agency, and she kept her side of things up well too. The other two smaller parts were taken by Graham Wilson and Denise Casey - who played husband and wife in When We Are Married. Though they had fun with their roles, the actual parts are rather under-written, and these two characters get the bum's rush at the end of the play, which is a pity, because they don't particularly deserve that. Bernie Crayston did the prologue and Andy Cook and Rosemary Richards did a couple of walk-on roles - again ones that weren't in the original script.

As the music wasn't either: yours truly composed the interludes between the scenes, and arranged a bunch of Australian songs for the overture and interval.

You can see a very posed photo from the rehearsals on the Otago Daily Times site. The review we got was written by Barbara Frame. She called the play, with great precision: an unremarkable but very pleasant romantic comedy. Since this blog is all about ME - just in case you hadn't guessed, and since I'm an inveterate blower of my own trumpet (you have to be, to be heard amongst the millions) she also said: Piano accompaniment by Michael Crowl, beginning with Advance Australia Fair and other well-known Australian pieces, and branching out into Crowl's own composition, adds sparkle to the evening.
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